Space Juice: an account of a visit with TTB, published in 2019

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Jan Lundquist
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Space Juice: an account of a visit with TTB, published in 2019

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Nate, this should probably be on reddit, if it isn't already. I can't upload it here, as I have maxed out on my allotment.

http://rexresearch.com/waldinwaves/SPACEJUICE.pdf

If it is an authentic and true document (keeping in mind Stepheson's dictum: Nothing succeeds like a document), this may be the last first person account we have of Townsend's activities at the late stage of life.

In 1978, when he was 73 years old (8 years into "retirement" if the federal government still had the 65 and out rule then) Townsend was living in Sunnyvale, CA, the home of Lockheed Martin Space and Missile Systems.

The Space Juice author, who had been conducting patent research nearby, had the opportunity to meet with him in his home lab. Townsend was still fascinated by the peak in piezoelectric power that followed the "movement" of the galactic center in relation to the earth and had several copper coated rocks hooked to his electrometers. He talked freely about those experiments, though he refused to identify one particular rock sample, or to talk about his electrogravitics work.

The author is "Waves Forest" and this was published in the "WaldinWaves" directory of the Rex Research site. I do not know if Waves is the same person as Robert Nelson, the owner of the site.

I had thought this was an inactive site, but upon reading further, I see that there some interesting new stuff there. Unfortunately, the site owner has run afoul of the law and fallen on hard times. If anyone feels called to pitch in the link is below the text.
Dear Reader : On 9 October 2023, Las Vegas police & Clark County ( NV ) 'Code Enforcement' kicked in the gate w/o a valid warrant and proceeded to raze the rancho property where I was sheltering / working doing cleanup while repairing my vehicle. Everything there was looted, confiscated, towed, or scooped up and dumpstered without any regard for "rights", laws, or inventory -- including my hazardous alchemy reagents, equipment, tools, clothes, etc -- particularly, 2 laptops containing all Rex Research data, 12000+ pdf books, &c in the process of transfer & uploads, and paper notes, & stuff. The '04 Pathfinder was towed, and I was arrested for alleged 'obstruction' ( witnessing ) and released 12 hours later @ 2 a.m., dressed in rags ( cleaning the chicken coop @ the moment of invasion ), with only wallet and phone. Reconstruction has been achingly slow as I slouch towards Bethlehem. At least I'm not in Gaza yet.
And I thank you who kindly donate to hlep this project continue its contribution . It is very heartening and empowering.
Signed : Dear Writer
P.S. -- Update 1-1-2024 -- Thanks to several kind and generous donations, Writer now happlessly owns nothing, plus a thrift store bike, bus pass, gym-shower membership, food stamps, laptop, change of pants, shoes, superglue, &c., & is saving $$ for a cheapo auction car. Shelter is in a shed, w/ extension cord for hot plate/lamp/charger. My poop kit works admirably. Life is good, thanks to You & that God-Universe thingy.
http://rexresearch.com/stuff/12024stuff/12024stuff.html
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Re: Space Juice: an account of a visit with TTB, published in 2019

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Following miscellaneous links from Rex Research: Paul, do you know this fusor researcher?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24xUkHz2MIU

"Kelly Waldin, Waves Forest" were graduates of a Scientology Self-improvement course, offered in Monterey, CA, ca 1982-83.
http://iapsop.com/archive/materials/aud ... or_189.pdf

Nate, an accidental find, not quite in your wheelhouse, but you might find it interesting. 1900s Radio drama, 2000s style.
https://trueaether.bandcamp.com/album/forest-waves
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Re: Space Juice: an account of a visit with TTB, published in 2019

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Jan Lundquist wrote: Sat Feb 03, 2024 5:45 pm Following miscellaneous links from Rex Research: Paul, do you know this fusor researcher?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24xUkHz2MIU

No, I don't think he (uhh.... what is his name, even?) contributes to fusor.net so not familiar.

His experiments with different grid configurations is interesting, but we've already seen the Holy Grail and none of those is it.

This... on the other hand...
Cathode-DSC_0163_600.jpg
.
Paul Schatzkin, author of 'The Man Who Mastered Gravity' https://amz.run/6afz
.
It's "a multigenerational project." What's your hurry?
.
"We will just sail away from the Earth, as easily as this boat pushed away from the dock" - TTB
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Re: Space Juice: an account of a visit with TTB, published in 2019

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Oh boy, another rabbit hole!
Jan Lundquist wrote: Sat Feb 03, 2024 4:21 pm http://rexresearch.com/waldinwaves/SPACEJUICE.pdf
.
The author is "Waves Forest" and this was published in the "WaldinWaves" directory of the Rex Research site. I do not know if Waves is the same person as Robert Nelson, the owner of the site.
I don't doubt the authenticity of the contents, but at this point, the weary cynic just has NO patience for anything published by anybody who is unwilling to use their real name.
I had thought this was an inactive site, but upon reading further, I see that there some interesting new stuff there. Unfortunately, the site owner has run afoul of the law and fallen on hard times. If anyone feels called to pitch in the link is below the text.
Oh. Well. I spoke too soon. That certainly adds to the credibility of the source...

🤦🏻‍♂️
Paul Schatzkin, author of 'The Man Who Mastered Gravity' https://amz.run/6afz
.
It's "a multigenerational project." What's your hurry?
.
"We will just sail away from the Earth, as easily as this boat pushed away from the dock" - TTB
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Re: Space Juice: an account of a visit with TTB, published in 2019

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Oh. Well. I spoke too soon. That certainly adds to the credibility of the source...
For what it's worth, Rex Research has been around a *long* time - the company (and by "company" I mean probably just the same one guy) was one of the outfits advertising "antigravity" papers and other Townsend Brown adjacent weird science documents in the back pages of Popular Mechanics in the 1980s. He's a data hoarder, a provider of oddly shaped documents, one of the few links to the weird-physics samizdat literature that we have. But he isn't a great editor.

In other words, it's time to back up his site before it goes down.

I'm not entirely surprised that he has trouble with the law. I am surprised that it's taken this long. Possibly lockdown/COVID accelerated his conspiracy mindset, as it did for a lot of people on the New Age spectrum.

I would imagine that "Waves Forest" is not the site owner and rather just one of the many, many weird authors that he's hosting.

I am intrigued that this particular document is dated 2019, and will give it a read.

Ok, so there's another copy of this out there, without the title "Space Juice". Rex Research's copy looks more authentic (ie, a scan, not HTML text). Ken Adachi's copy though is copy-pastable, so that's nice.

https://educate-yourself.org/cn/Rock-El ... eb19.shtml

This might give us some clue as to the author:
In the Spring of 1978, Townsend Brown showed me around the lab at his home in Sunnyvale, California. It turned out to be just minutes from the patent library where I'd spent many hours studying and copying his and others' patents, while working on Free Energy: Healing the Earth. He liked the article, and that invitation to visit was extended through the publisher Tom Valentine, the first to print it, in the January 1978 National Exchange.
Google is getting worse for searching esoteric things. I'm going to assume that "National Exchange" was some kind of very small print magazine ('zine, even). Tom Valentine is a New Age-ish author: GoodReads lists him here: https://www.goodreads.com/author/list/3 ... _Valentine

"The Life and Death of Planet Earth" (1977) was probably Valentine's debut.

So the phrase "Free Energy" dates back to 1978, and possibly to Waves Forest, hmm. I first came across it in the 1980s, in the loosely interlinked Adventures Unlimited (David Hatcher Childress) / Psychotronics Association circle of writers, and then in many, many New Age works since then - who all have a bad habit of just cloning information from others without asking who actually came up with the ideas first.
Although the output fluctuation cycled over a 24-hour period, it didn't correlate with the sun's position. Brown had just recently established, to his excitement, that the rocks' electrical emissions peaked when the core of our galaxy was directly overhead.
That does seem a different result from what he was talking about in the 1950s with the Differential Electrometer.
These factors still apply forty years later to the rather obvious question, why did this story take so long to write? Parts of it were set down years ago, then put on hold until now. I did address a few aspects in the Space-Age Snow-job section of the 1986 version of Further Connections, but since then have mostly left it alone except for a few radio discussions.
So here's another hint to the author's identity. Google at least coughs up this fact: a review of Ivan Stang's 1988 "High Weirdness by Mail". https://www.goodreads.com/en/book/show/809403
The last part of the book consists of an excerpt from Waves Forest's Further Connections.
So we know that Waves Forest, if a pseudonym, was in use before 1988.

Nate
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Re: Space Juice: an account of a visit with TTB, published in 2019

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Interesting that the pseudonym seems to be from a Monterrey Scientology Class, indicating the author was in the area. To a Southern California way of thinking, Monterrey is just next door to Menlo Park/Stanford. and of course Sunnyvale.

But I believe this may be the orginal author. Sorry for the quality of the OCR. Link at bottom
THURSDAY, JULY 28, 1977 MONEY, JOBS 'Free Energy' Era I Possibility Studied ; By JOHN H. LVST ' In this, time of "energy crisis" the i experiments of such quiet researchers as J.G. - Gallimore of Indianapolis and T. Townsend Brown of California may de serve more than curious passing glances.: l Certainly the 1 ideas of both are unusual.' , . I Gallimore among other things sees the prospect ot -free energy" by merely tapping I the atmosphere, which he views as ' "the sea of energy around us." .Brown has been suggesting there is some possibility that electricity may be naturally stored in certain rocks, such as granite, and that someday it might be tapped as an alternative power.

Call it "rock electricity." Both Gallimore and Brown are among investigators of energies traditionally relegated to. the heap of unexplained phenomena and seldom subject of any study except by those in esoteric fields like dowsing which until recent years may have seemed more like witchcraft, magic or pure fakery than a topic of serious attention for physicists. , BUT SLOWLY all that seems to be changing. More classical scientists are becoming interested in things science can not explain. Some of the most exhaustive work on dowsing for instance was done by Or.

Z. V. Harvalik, a Washington (D C.) based physicist who since his retirement from government work has also been doing work in radionics, i The esoteric science of radionics may owe its origins to that moment in the late 1800s when a young American medical student named Albert Abrams watched Italian tenor Enrico Caruso flick a pure tone on the rim of a drinking glass and then shatter the glass by singing the same tone. , PR. ABRAMS who went on to teach many years at Stanford University devoted much of his life in the attempt to prove that such a feat was not a mere trick but rather just one illustration of a principle which modern science had not yet confirmed.

-:. Radionics, as he called it, was based on the theory that all matter radiates wave forms or vibrations. t Gallimore, 37, brought together at Indianapolis a group of researchers in April, 1975, for the formation of a new group called the United States Radionics Congress. After its 1976 meeting on the American University campus at Washington, D.C., the congress changed its name to the United States Psychotropics Association. It is scheduled to meet next month at Los Angeles where Gallimore and others will present papers oo their latest work.

AND PEOPLE THE FOLKLORE AND official records of suspicions and theories of special energies go back thousands of years and history is spattered with the scientific martyrdom of such men as Goethe, Karl Von Reichenbach, Wilhelm Reich and Nikola Tesla. While such men were acknowledged privately as brilliant, they were ridiculed or persecuted by a public whose conventional wisdoms or commercial enterprises were challenged by the scientists' new theories of universal energies. Gallimore, whose book "The Handbook of Unusual Energies" maps much of the basic technical history of such work, believes that the work on unusual energies is about to gain significant momentum from the formal scientific community. AN INDEPENDENT researcher, Gallimore, who has served as a consultant for private corporations, supports his work with the manufacture and sale of his radionics devices which he now encourages classical scientists to examine. Much of Gallimore's work is in what he has called "neutricity," named because it is an energy with a neutral charge.

Gallimore contends this energy in a sense runs parallel to electricity. While he has not yet publicly demonstrated it, Gallimore contends that "neutricity" might be available by merely drawing it out of the air or could be generated much like electricity. Gallimore says this would tie into some of the work done by Reich on "orgone" energy and by Reichenbach on what was called the "odic" force. 1 BOTH GALLIMORE and T. Townsend Brown, a physist who over the years has done extensive government work and now headquarters at the laboratory of the Townsend Brown Foundation at Sunnyvale, Calif, are highly interested in gravity research.

It is "gravitational radiation" which is the basis for Brown's so-called "rock electricity." HE HAS SAID that it is his "belief that the total energy so received at the surface of the earth may equal or exceed that of all other forms of radiation received from cosmic space. It might even represent a new source of energy useful for mankind." If such ideas seem too wild and remote to consider seriously, Brown's own comment may serve as a footnote for keeping an open mind: "Even though at present, the current is minuscule, one need only recall that the first evidence of atomic fission (1934-39). appeared on sensitive cathode ray oscilloscopes of Enrico Fermi, Lise Meitner and others. "They had no idea at that time of the tremendous power of atomic bombs or of the use to which atomic power could be put in the years to come. "Rock electricity" he added, "may be in that same position today." Lyst an h-ibutsd lost In LIVE Aua Oct Dec Jan Feb Apr Jun Aim Jan Dec June Aug Sep Oct NOV Jan Mar Apr May 112; 2843; 139; LIVE Oct Dec Feb Apr Jun Jul Aug Oct Feb 0; 3733; 79; Nov Mar Apr May II; Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Nov PORK Aug Feb Mar May Jul Aug May 2587; 75.
https://www.newspapers.com/article/the- ... 130347063/
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Re: Space Juice: an account of a visit with TTB, published in 2019

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Interesting find! The reporter, John H Lyst, would four years later become editor of the Indianapolis Star:

https://www.legacy.com/us/obituaries/in ... =144899350
During a 45-year career at The Star, Lyst covered everything from the police beat to the collapse of Communism. Named editor in October 1979, he had shaped the newspaper's opinion pages until his retirement in June 2000. In a retirement tribute, the newspaper editorialized that at a time "when shouting is often confused with debate, Lyst has offered the newspaper's readers a quiet wisdom and an unwavering dedication to the art of listening." Prior to his appointment as editor, Lyst was a business writer and financial editor known for his column," Money, Jobs, and People," selections of which were syndicated nationally by the North American Newspaper Alliance. Honored with a CASPER award in 1969 for a series documenting the difficulties of finding jobs for the hard-core unemployed, he remarked the column might have been more appropriately named "People, Jobs, and Money" because "I always try to put interesting people and the interest of people first." The column ran five days a week for eight years and four days a week for four more years, winning numerous awards including the 1976 Lester Hunt Award for investigative reporting.
Meanwhile, his article:
Gallimore, 37, brought together at Indianapolis a group of researchers in April, 1975, for the formation of a new group called the United States Radionics Congress. After its 1976 meeting on the American University campus at Washington, D.C., the congress changed its name to the United States Psychotropics Association.
Psychotronics, actually, with an N. Although it was the 1970s, so I suspect liberal usage of psychotropics was also involved.

Yep, that's the group I keep talking about as being the circle that was fascinated in the 1970s by Townsend Brown: Jerry Gallimore's USPA. I've read in some potted biographies that Gallimore was a crystallographer for the US Navy, so there are clear Navy/CIA links to his circle.

Note that "psychotronics" is specifically a USSR term for psi/ESP, and that the people who were most interested in that term were Russian-speaking US people with military affiliations who were worried about the Soviets potentially winning a "psi race". See also, the group around Mankind Research Unlimited ( https://ionamiller.weebly.com/mankind-r ... mited.html ), another slightly earlier 1970s group who overlapped with the USPA circle.

It doesn't surprise me that USPA started as a Radionics group - but that to me would point strongly to it being an offshoot of Meade Layne and Riley Crabb's "Borderlands Sciences Research Foundation", because BSRF were into UFOs and psychics and various esoteric Forteana, but were always super interested in Radionics (in very particular, the work of Ruth Drown).

I don't think that Jerry Gallimore is Waves Forest, because IIRC Gallimore died in the 1980s. However WF would very likely have been part of the BSRF / USPA circle, before their specific cluster of ideas spread into the wider 1970s New Age scene and became unexamined stock furniture in popular counterculture mythology.

WF in "Space Juice" describes himself as being "young" in 1975, which I think would be younger than 37:
The first version of this story I ever heard was from Riley Crabb in 1975... Riley and Judith were very generous with their time and information; I gathered there weren't as many young people seriously into this stuff in those days. Riley had a lot of fascinating esoteric stories and advice, and so did Judith, although the advice I mostly recalled from her was that, for energetic balance, I should spend less time studying and more time with my girlfriends. In following her suggestion I might have over-corrected for a while; it was the 1970's after all.
He also talks about illustrating the magazine "Energy Unlimited":
In 1978, I learned about Viktor Schauberger, and much else, from Walter Baumgartner in LA. He and Kathleen Joyce had just started publishing the magazine Energy Unlimited, and they reprinted my free energy article in the second issue. I drew a few covers for them and ran another long story in the Spring 1981 issue, called New Ocean Technologies, part of which applies to the section after this.
Flickr has a cover of April/June 1978 Energy Unlimited, which is signed "W.F.":

https://www.flickr.com/photos/esaruoho/ ... otostream/


A 2011 eulogy for Walter Baumgartner by Jeanne Manning, suggests that the USPA circle's obsession with Viktor Schauberger was because of Baumgartner - which he got perhaps from Walter Russell. If so, then it's a strand in the Free Energy mythology which doesn't come from the 1970s USSR "psychotronics" scene, but from much earlier.

https://web.archive.org/web/20120101064 ... be-missed/

It may be worth investigating Marcel Vogel, since he's one of the otherwise well-known scientists with unusual beliefs who keep turning up all around the US military-industrial-weirdness complex.
Credibility-wise, Marcel Vogel was way up there. He developed the magnetic disc coating for hard drives, and the liquid crystals that led to every modern flat-screen display, and years earlier he came up with the highly reflective highway stripe paint that helps millions drive more safely at night.

He's also the one who gave Chris Bird and Peter Tompkins a huge mass of exotic science information that led to their book The Secret Life Of Plants in 1973. That book, with some two hundred references, gave me more leads than any other source up to that point, on the subjects I was seeking to understand.
WF appears to have walked away from his 1978 meeting with Townsend Brown with a *very* different interpretation of Townsend's involvement in the "Philadelphia Experiment" than what I would have taken from Townsend's words:
But Brown's “oblique confirmation” did happen, during our next visit. The Philadelphia Experiment by William Moore and Charles Berlitz had recently appeared, with a chapter about “The Force Fields of Townsend Brown” [Chapter 10, page 81], so of course I had to ask about it. His answer was intriguing: “I don't think the Navy is ready for invisibility experiments”.

He added that he really would have preferred they hadn't named him in their book without asking, as he was getting a lot of questions. The last thing I wanted was to add to his discomfort on the matter, so I left it at that. I did not then and still don't have the ruthless temperament to be an investigative reporter in any conventional sense. And since there is some potential risk for those involved in the subjects that mostly interest me, I've always tried to take a comparatively gentle approach.
So, to me, that's *not* a confirmation. If Townsend Brown told me "I don't think the Navy is ready for invisibility experiments", I would take it to mean literally what it says: *the US Navy is literally not ready because neither the US Navy nor anyone else on the planet has the technology or even the underlying physical theory for invisibility*. That would accord with everything that common sense and the known history of science and WW2 tells us. Unless one was specifically and previously sold on the idea that TPX *must have* happened... what else would "not ready" mean other than, literally, *not ready*?
The other part of the confirmation went like this: Later in our visit he pulled out a huge volume called Who's Who In Frontier Science and Technology, and showed me his listing, observing my reaction as I read it. Seeing that I hadn't yet caught the detail he intended me to notice, he xeroxed the page and gave it to me to study again later.

This was clearly not about pointing out his fame. At no point in our visits had he showed any awards, commendations, photos of him with prominent figures or any of that. Besides, he knew I was already as impressed as I could possibly be with any human.

So the key point jumped out at me later, when I had time to re-read his Who's Who listing. It provided the complete chronology of his career, except for one crucial omission. After his role in heading up the US Navy's research and development on degaussing equipment and related magnetic field manipulation, which lasted partway into 1943, there's a two-year gap with no mention of what he was up to. Right when the “Philadelphia Experiment” was alleged to have happened.
Yeah, but, we know that that gap was when Townsend had quit the Navy, don't we? He was on the opposite side of the country working for Lockheed/Vega.

Was Townsend perhaps trying to tell WF "look, I can't tell you what I was doing in 1943 because classified, but, it certainly didn't involve Philadelphia"? And that was taken to mean the exact opposite?
I got to meet with Townsend Brown a few more times after that, and he was always amazingly kind, patient and encouraging. He never appeared to show any bitterness about the world being denied the benefits of his discoveries, and the future that might have been. And I never came up with a way to ask about how his ideas might actually be getting implemented in classified projects, without violating whatever nondisclosure agreements he was still under. When he relocated to Avalon on Catalina Island I lost contact. It was reported that in October 1985 he moved on to that great laboratory in the sky.
Having read all of "Space Juice", I find WF's ideas even in 2019 to be almost a perfect capsule of all of the 1970s "High Weirdness by Mail" stuff that I first stumbled into in the 1980s. Townsend Brown figures large in this mythology but I feel that the ideas jump more *from* Townsend to... strange things, rather than being about what Townsend was actually thinking and doing.

This cluster of ideas includes: there is a pre-physical, psychic/awareness reality from which physical reality is created (I believe this). Then that there's an "ether" by which the psychic/physical interface is mediated (I believe there must be such an interface, but it doesn't have to involve a Victorian conception of a mechanical hydraulic ether). Then that Townsend's electrostatic-gravity ideas are proven beyond doubt (I don't think they are; there's interesting hints, but I don't see full proof yet). Then that, following from this, the Earth must have weird things going on beneath our feet (I feel like this is trying to smuggle Hollow Earth theory in and I don't understand why, I have no interest in Hollow Earth mythology at all). Then, that the many proposed antigravity and alternative health technologies proposed in the last century must all be true (I don't believe they are), but they aren't being used. From this, the leap is made that *of course, there is a giant conspiracy which has all of these technologies and is using them, and so it must be cosmically evil with plans to enslave us all*. At this point, I have fully noped out.

Yet this has now become a standard belief in the New Age and "wellness" community, as well as in one major political party in the USA.

I worry about where this casual assumption of an evil global superpowered truth-suppressing conspiracy came from, and where it's going. I think what this belief has done to the New Age scene from the 1970s to right now is pretty bad (see antivax and QAnon); but if it continues along this trajectory, the default assumption of a conspiracy in popular thinking could get *much much worse* in the future.

I don't see the proof for a conspiracy that WF sees. Rather, I see a lot of interesting speculations, many of which are wrong, and a lot of proposed magical devices throughout history, many of which just don't work (or always hover right on the edge of replication). If there is a superscience conspiracy, these do not provide the proof of one, for me. Also, I grew up with this conspiracy idea and frankly I'm kind of tired of it; it's not new to me and in my opinion it doesn't lead anywhere. Various overlooked missing threads in science, sure. Investigate those. The mind-body problem, yep, keep banging on that door, it's important. But don't walk around assuming as your default mental set that *of course* there are superpowered black magic space emperors running Earth in alliance with reptilian aliens from underground cities. That is a recipe for mental bad-place-ness.

But I am interested in why so many people in and around the BSRF / USPA circles in the 1970s felt this conspiracy idea so strongly, back when it *was* new. Especially when many of these people held day jobs in the US Navy, CIA, Air Force, or related military/intelligence/science organizations. The conspiracy might or might not exist... but the implications of 50 years of conspiracy thinking among active military people or military contractors... that's something very real and considering David Grusch's claims, appears to be still ongoing.

Edit:

I found Tom Valentine's 1977 "The Life and Death of Planet Earth" on Internet Archive:
https://archive.org/details/TheLifeAndD ... 6/mode/1up

The dedication page is interesting.
This book is dedicated to an organization and a person. The organization is The Stelle Group, a gathering of courageous people who are striving toward the ultimate frontier of human perfection and an optimum civilization. The person is Kathy Redmond, who worked tirelessly to curb my over-exuberance, to uplift my downers, to sharpen my syntax, and generally to bring about a better book .

It is vital that each reader fully understand that, although I am a member of The Stelle Group, I do not necessarily speak for the other members or
the governing body. The conjecture in this book is entirely my own and does not necessarily correspond with the thinking of my organization. It is
a tribute to the spirit of our community that each individual member is not only permitted, but encouraged, to think for himself and express his
individualism. In this organization, though we all seek the same goals of egoic advancement and a better civilization, we each maintain total individuality.
Ok so why this is interesting is because Stelle, as I've mentioned before, is David Hatcher Childress's (Adventures Unlimited / The Antigravity Handbook) old cult. One of the many post-Theosophical groups. Childress didn't create it, but like Valentine he became a member. Then Stelle went through a breakup in the 1970s/1980s and is now just a town with some nice solar panels and hippie publishers.

Anyway, Stelle as a group certainly did have a very conspiratorial view of the world. I wonder if they were perhaps more influential in New Age scenes (and particularly the kind of New Age scenes that overlapped with the US military) than I'd realised?

Specifically, Stelle's influence on the Weird Scene now goes back to 1977 for Valentine, not 1985 for Childress.

1977 was a *ridiculously* fertile year for the New Age / Free Energy / Psychotronics scene. A whole bunch of weird-physics books dropped or were in progress at that time. To say nothing of Star Wars and Close Encounters. Also, 1977 had been picked as an "end of the world" date by several alleged prophets (spoiler: they were wrong) and 1975 had also been Theosophy's "quarter-century review" year (2025 will be the next one). It was a very busy period in the collective human imagination, in other words.

A second quote from WF's Riley Crabb section that caught my eye on reread:
I have some doubts about that version, starting with the very premise that any spontaneous nuclear exchange is even possible, or it probably would have happened long ago. I suspect there are specific harmonic requirements as to the exact timing and placement of thermonuclear detonations, and the actual “weapon” has always been just the threat of the possibility, a global bluff and psyop for conditioning human beliefs and compliance, and a suitably expensive cover story for much weirder black projects.
This particular and very unusual theory (that nuclear explosions can only occur at "harmonic" times and locations) comes straight from my fellow New Zealander, Bruce Cathie. I have tried to read Cathie and all I get is an enormous headache and a sense that the writer had some major psychological issues. In my opinion, none of Cathie's ideas follow logically from each other, and his thesis does not accord with my common sense understanding that, actually, nuclear weapons are very real and very blunt weapons that can be detonated wherever, and that the Cold War really was about the USA and USSR trying to intimidate each other using them.

But the question of "how did we manage to survive the Cold War without starting a nuclear war?" is a good one.

A third observation, from Iona Miller's MRU page:
PSYCHOTRONICS: Czech term for “parapsychology” (excluding the study of survival), but embracing certain phenomena that are not now generally accepted as parapsychological. According to (the late) Larissa Vilenskaya (1983, p. 107), the term was first proposed with the analogy of “bionics” in mind, to refer to “the field dealing with the construction of devices capable of enhancing and/or reproducing certain psi phenomena (such as psychokinesis in the case of ‘psychotronic generators’ developed by Robert Pavlita) and later embraced some other phenomena.” [Dale & White, 1977]
The claim about the word "psychotronics" being a deliberate reference to "psionics" is interesting to me, because it's been my feeling that the people working in the field of bionics (in the 1950s/1960s) as it was being created seemed to be very open to the Weird. These people were often radar and sonar people. I'm thinking particularly of Townsend's colleague Lucien Geradin, but also the novelist Martin Caidin comes to mind.

Nate
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Re: Space Juice: an account of a visit with TTB, published in 2019

Post by Jan Lundquist »

This cluster of ideas includes: there is a pre-physical, psychic/awareness reality from which physical reality is created (I believe this). Then that there's an "ether" by which the psychic/physical interface is mediated (I believe there must be such an interface, but it doesn't have to involve a Victorian conception of a mechanical hydraulic ether). Then that Townsend's electrostatic-gravity ideas are proven beyond doubt (I don't think they are; there's interesting hints, but I don't see full proof yet). Then that, following from this, the Earth must have weird things going on beneath our feet (I feel like this is trying to smuggle Hollow Earth theory in and I don't understand why, I have no interest in Hollow Earth mythology at all). Then, that the many proposed antigravity and alternative health technologies proposed in the last century must all be true (I don't believe they are), but they aren't being used. From this, the leap is made that *of course, there is a giant conspiracy which has all of these technologies and is using them, and so it must be cosmically evil with plans to enslave us all*.
The above mishmash is what drove me to look at the documented history around Townsend's life. I have often found that I am led to surprising conclusions, but none of them are as way out as some of these claims.
Yet this has now become a standard belief in the New Age and "wellness" community, as well as in one major political party in the USA.

I worry about where this casual assumption of an evil global superpowered truth-suppressing conspiracy came from, and where it's going. I think what this belief has done to the New Age scene from the 1970s to right now is pretty bad (see antivax and QAnon); but if it continues along this trajectory, the default assumption of a conspiracy in popular thinking could get *much much worse* in the future.
This is what happens to a populace that has devalued and even stigmatized education. There is a current meme here in the US that calls the November election a National IQ test and they are not wrong.
A 2011 eulogy for Walter Baumgartner by Jeanne Manning, suggests that the USPA circle's obsession with Viktor Schauberger was because of Baumgartner - which he got perhaps from Walter Russell. If so, then it's a strand in the Free Energy mythology which doesn't come from the 1970s USSR "psychotronics" scene, but from much earlier.
I didn't know that Schauberger had been tricked into giving up his work until I listened to Jesse's video. I haven't looked into that story, but the event was sometime in the late fifties, if that helps you with your chronology.

I would love to see you publishing your work for a wider audience, Nate. Have you thought about It? You pour so much into each post that it's a shame to keep it down here in the rabbit warren of our wide-ranging discussions.

Jan
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Jan Lundquist
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Re: Space Juice: an account of a visit with TTB, published in 2019

Post by Jan Lundquist »

Paul, can you please fix the typo in the thread title?

Thank you,
Jan
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Re: Space Juice: an account of a visit with TTB, published in 2019

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Uh, it's not a good idea to ask an OCD perfectionist to 'fix' a thing.

Fixing the header at the top of the tread was easy enough, but that fix does not pass on to the other posts in the thread that use the same subject header. I had to change each of those manually. 😱

But... done.
Paul Schatzkin, author of 'The Man Who Mastered Gravity' https://amz.run/6afz
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It's "a multigenerational project." What's your hurry?
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"We will just sail away from the Earth, as easily as this boat pushed away from the dock" - TTB
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Re: Space Juice: an account of a visit with TTB, published in 2019

Post by Paul Schatzkin »

Jan Lundquist wrote: Sat Mar 02, 2024 6:05 pm I would love to see you publishing your work for a wider audience, Nate. Have you thought about It? You pour so much into each post that it's a shame to keep it down here in the rabbit warren of our wide-ranging discussions.
I am quite certain that we have the makings of another volume in all this material.

I'm less certain who is going to compile/write it.

And I say that full knowing that 'books' are an antiquated art form. Jesse's video has already gotten tens of thousands more views than I've sold books.

But, then, the books aren't free...

--PS
Paul Schatzkin, author of 'The Man Who Mastered Gravity' https://amz.run/6afz
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It's "a multigenerational project." What's your hurry?
.
"We will just sail away from the Earth, as easily as this boat pushed away from the dock" - TTB
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Re: Space Juice: an account of a visit with TTB, published in 2019

Post by Jan Lundquist »

Thank you for the fix. I would have been happy with just the top one changed.
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