Notebook for Random Ideas (post hiccup)

Greetings and Saluations! Anyone still falling down the Rabbit Hole is welcome here. All the old threads have been "locked" to prevent further posting, but are still available for your perusal. Let's continue the discussion here. Have fun, but be careful with it...

Viktor Vacquier

Postby Griffin » Sun Jan 25, 2009 2:51 am

Hello Linda Brown,

I hope all is going well for you.

Viktor Vacquier’s obituary (see excerpt and link below) appeared in the Los Angeles Times today.

I would think that your father, Admiral Harry Hess, Dr. Robert Sarbacher, and perhaps Jacques Bergier -- who shared a Russian-French background with him -- would have known him and his work. Plate tectonics, magnetics, ocean floor gravity anomalies, deep ocean exploration, and submarines could have been some of the areas of interest they had in common.

As ever,

Griffin

Victor Vacquier Sr. dies at 101; geophysicist was a master of magnetics


By Thomas H. Maugh II
Los Angeles Times

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld ... rint.story

January 24, 2009

Victor Vacquier Sr., a Scripps Institution of Oceanography geophysicist who developed key instruments for mapping the Earth's magnetic fields and whose research provided a strong experimental foundation for the now widely accepted theory of plate tectonics, died of pneumonia Jan. 11 in La Jolla. He was 101.

An academic rarity who became a full professor without ever earning a doctoral degree, Vacquier was a master of magnetics, developing key instruments for the military and then adapting them for use in research.

As an electrical engineer at Gulf Research Laboratories in the 1930s, Vacquier invented the flux magnetometer, a new tool for detecting magnetic fields.

With the outbreak of World War II, he went to the Airborne Instruments Laboratory at Columbia University to oversee testing of the device. Preliminary experiments showed that it could successfully identify a submerged submarine.
Griffin
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Re: Notebook for Random Ideas (post hiccup)

Postby amalie » Wed Feb 04, 2009 11:20 pm

Dear Forum,

This corner of Siberia is a hotbed for cosmic events

http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2009/02/0 ... ction.html

Note that the Tungaska is implicated, again in 1908, one hundred years ago, Tungaska was the location of the largest ever recorded cosmic impact or blast leveling 800 square miles of forest .

Cosmic coincidence or an indication of the affinity between the magnetic nature of the planetary interior and the circulating deep space structures.

Amalie
amalie
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