The Challenge of Thinking Different

Niels_Bohr
 Sometimes there is more than one answer:

Some time ago I received a call from a colleague. He was about to give a student a zero for his answer to a physics question, while the student claimed a perfect score. The instructor and the student agreed to an impartial arbiter, and I was selected.I read the examination question:
“SHOW HOW IT IS POSSIBLE TO DETERMINE THE HEIGHT OF A TALL BUILDING WITH THE AID OF A BAROMETER.”

The student had answered, “Take the barometer to the top of the
building, attach a long rope to it, lower it to the street, and then
bring it up, measuring the length of the rope. The length of the rope
is the height of the building.”

“Finally,” he concluded, “there are many other ways of solving the
problem. Probably the best,” he said, “is to take the barometer to the
basement and knock on the superintendent’s door. When the
superintendent answers, you speak to him as follows: “Mr.
Superintendent, here is a fine barometer. If you will tell me the
height of the building, I will give you this barometer.” At this point,
I asked the student if he really did not know the conventional answer
to this question. He admitted that he did, but said that he was fed up
with high school and college instructors trying to teach him how to think. The student was Neils Bohr.

And I'm quite certain that's exactly what Sarah Palin had in mind when she said she didn't necessarily want to provide the actual answers to the questions she was asked during the VP debate. 

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